• classifier (linguistics) and similar topics

    classifier (linguistics) and similar topics

    Grammatical gender Specific form of noun class system in which the division of noun classes forms an agreement system with another aspect of the language, such as adjectives, articles, pronouns, or verbs. Used in approximately one quarter of the world's languages

  • classifiers - linguistics - oxford bibliographies

    classifiers - linguistics - oxford bibliographies

    Oct 15, 2019 · Classifiers and noun classes are basic kinds of noun categorization devices

  • semantic classifiers in sign language linguistics

    semantic classifiers in sign language linguistics

    The ASL classifier is a "pronoun". Like pronouns, a referent (noun) must be signed before a classifier can be applied to. This "1" handshape of the classifier can be used to represent an object or a person. An object is usually thin and/or tall object (eg. twig, pole, pen, etc.)

  • classifier - wiktionary

    classifier - wiktionary

    Mar 25, 2021 · classifier (plural classifiers) Someone who classifies. quotations ▼ (linguistics) A word or morpheme used in some languages (such as Japanese and American Sign Language), in certain contexts (such as counting), to indicate the semantic class to which something belongs

  • classifiers and dp | linguistic inquiry | mit press

    classifiers and dp | linguistic inquiry | mit press

    As discussed in C&S 1999 (see above), with reference to Croft 1994, sortal classifiers do not create a measure, as mensural classifiers do; instead, they simply name the unit that is already present in the semantic denotation of the noun. Their use is grammatically necessary. Consequently (without semantic contribution, with grammatical function), they are functional elements, just as determiners are …

  • classifier (linguistics) - wikimili, the best wikipedia reader

    classifier (linguistics) - wikimili, the best wikipedia reader

    A classifier (abbreviated clf or cl) is a word or affix that accompanies nouns and can be considered to "classify" a noun depending on the type of its referent. It is also sometimes called a …

  • classifier- wiktionary

    classifier- wiktionary

    Mar 25, 2021 · classifier (plural classifiers) Someone who classifies. quotations ▼ (linguistics) A word or morpheme used in some languages (such as Japanese and American Sign Language), in certain contexts (such as counting), to indicate the semantic class to which something belongs

  • classifiers and dp|linguisticinquiry | mit press

    classifiers and dp|linguisticinquiry | mit press

    As discussed in C&S 1999 (see above), with reference to Croft 1994, sortal classifiers do not create a measure, as mensural classifiers do; instead, they simply name the unit that is already present in the semantic denotation of the noun. Their use is grammatically necessary. Consequently (without semantic contribution, with grammatical function), they are functional elements, just as determiners are …

  • classifiers(linguistics) - lc linked data service

    classifiers(linguistics) - lc linked data service

    Classifiers (Linguistics) Please provide your name, email, and your suggestion so that we can begin assessing any terminology changes. Fields denoted with an asterisk (*) are required

  • semantic classifiersin sign languagelinguistics

    semantic classifiersin sign languagelinguistics

    The ASL classifier is a "pronoun". Like pronouns, a referent (noun) must be signed before a classifier can be applied to. This "1" handshape of the classifier can be used to represent an object or a person. An object is usually thin and/or tall object (eg. twig, pole, pen, etc.)

  • "classifiers"american sign language (asl)

    Classifiers are signs that are used to represent general categories or "classes" of things. They can be used to describe the size and shape of an object (or person). They can be used to represent the object itself, or the way the object moves or relates to other objects (or people)

  • classifiers determiners |linguisticinquiry | mit press

    classifiers determiners |linguisticinquiry | mit press

    Cheng and Sybesma (1999, 2005) argue that classifiers in Chinese are equivalent to a definite article. We argue against this position on empirical grounds, drawing attention to the fact that semantically, syntactically, and functionally, Chinese classifiers are not on the same footing as definite determiners

  • linguistics-language classification| britannica

    linguistics-language classification| britannica

    There are two kinds of classification of languages practiced in linguistics: genetic (or genealogical) and typological. The purpose of genetic classification is to group languages into families according to their degree of diachronic relatedness

  • linguistics: the study of (signed) language

    linguistics: the study of (signed) language

    Linguistics is the scientific study of natural language, including its studies in history, structure, and acquisition of language. It is concerned with the fundamental questions of what language is. ... Morphology, Classifiers, Compounding and blending of ASL signs, Mouth morphemes, and some more. Syntax. Syntax is the study of sentence

  • genders andclassifiers: a cross-linguistictypology

    genders andclassifiers: a cross-linguistictypology

    Classifiers of several types also serve to categorize entities. Numeral classifiers occur with number words, possessive classifiers appear in the expressions of possession, and verbal classifiers are used on a verb, categorizing its argument. Genders and classifiers of varied types can occur

  • a study ofswedish speakers' learning of chinesenoun

    a study ofswedish speakers' learning of chinesenoun

    Classifiers (CLs) are one of the common features found in Asian languages such as Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese, Khmer Chrau, Thai, and Burmese. Classifiers categorize classes of nouns and emphasize some particular properties of the corresponding real-world entities

  • graduate students|classification|linguistics

    graduate students|classification|linguistics

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